EXPLORE
The John Warner School
  • A History of Excellence
  • Committed to Excellence

About our School

The John Warner School

The John Warner School is a vibrant, successful and forward-facing academy situated in the market town of Hoddesdon in Hertfordshire.

The school is part of The Hoddesdon School Trust (multi-academy chain) which also includes two local primary schools, Roselands and Cranbourne.

With a school community numbering nearly 1300 11-18 year old students and over 100 staff, we are proud of our long history of making significant contributions to education in the area as well as further afield.

“We have earned a reputation over many years for respecting the value, worth and dignity of all our students. We strive to provide a high standard of education in which all students can achieve their full potential.” David Kennedy, Headteacher.

Learning is at the heart of everything that we do. The courses that we offer are broad, balanced and fit for a future where change is constant, and to be embraced.

We are determined to bring out the best in every individual by helping them develop their skills, interests and abilities.

In recent years we have secured and deployed £18 million worth of development which means that students now study and learn in some of the best designed and resourced accommodation in the country.

We pride ourselves on our strong sense of community where staff, students and parents work together in order to ensure that individuals are able to realise their lifetime goals.

Our very strong links with a wide variety of educational, cultural and commercial organisations enable us to provide a rich seam of experiences that complement and enhance the education we offer.

 

Modern facilities

History of The John Warner School

The present school site dates from 1953 and adopted the name John Warner in January 1968 in recognition of the major contribution made by him to the development of education in Hoddesdon in the Nineteenth Century. John Warner, a Quaker, born in 1776 in the City of London, acquired Rawdon House and grounds in 1841 and built the first school for boys of all classes and any religious beliefs.

This British School for Boys was open for 20 years. Three subsequent schools, the National (Church of England) School for Boys (1844), the British School for Girls (1847), the National School for Girls (1858) - were amalgamated in 1930 and, having adopted the name of Hoddesdon Secondary School, moved to our present site in 1953.

Coming right up to date the school is an all ability comprehensive school.

The school is the proud holder of a number of quality measures; Charter Mark, Investors in People, Sport England, Sportsmark Award, Healthy Schools and three school achievement awards. In 2004 the school became a Science College after generous support from industrial sponsors.

In 2011 the school was graded 'outstanding' by Ofsted and became a convertor academy. In 2016 the school formed The Hoddesdon School Trust (multi-academy chain) with local primary schools, Roselands and Cranbourne.

The school has some of the best educational facilities in the country including state of the art science laboratories and sports centre. We are also an associate technology college with a vibrant Art, Design and Technology Faculty including new art studios and a bespoke engineering and design block. Most recent new buildings include a modern foreign language block, a new school library and mathematics block and a new classroom block for the faculty of English. The school is currently in the process of replacing the large 'North Block' with modern classrooms and facilities due to open in 2017.

 

Our School Badge

The quarters on the school badge represent the original four Wards of the Urban District:

Hoddesdon: The Saint Catherine's Wheel denotes the Patron Saint of the ancient chapel which stood on the site of the present Clock Tower in the town centre.  

Rye Park: Represented by the facade of Rye House, renowned as the place where plans were made by conspirators in 1693 to kill the then king.  

Broxbourne: Symbolised by a badger, used by the Ancient families of Broxbourne on their coat-of-arms.  

Wormley: The Parish of St Laurence is represented by the griddle of grid-iron on which the Patron Saint was martyred.

Oak Tree: The oak tree in the centre indicates the wooded nature of the area.